Film director Jean-Luc Godard, father of the ‘nouvelle vague’, dies at the age of 91 | Culture

French-Swiss director Jean-Luc Godard, father of the new wave who revolutionized cinema in the sixties, has died at the age of 91. the french newspaper Release has broken the news. Godard, director of films such as Live your life, The Chinese either goodbye to languagehe championed the cinematographic revolution that imposed the treatment of themes with new techniques that until then had remained outside the screens.

Critic in the legendary magazine cinema notebooks in post-war France, he railed against the cinematography of the day and launched into making his own films. At the end of the escapein 1960, it was his first great international success, a film starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg that revolutionized the cinematographic language with innovative editing, groundbreaking framing and a novel use of sound. Alfaville, Weekend Y contempt These are other of his works in which he did not shy away from political commentary.

Jean-Luc Godard, in Paris in 1965 during the filming of 'Alphaville'.
Jean-Luc Godard, in Paris in 1965 during the filming of ‘Alphaville’.getty

Godard was born in Paris on December 3, 1930. His parents were Swiss and, during World War II, the whole family returned to the Swiss country. Years later he returned to France to study at the Sorbonne. During his university years and thanks to his constant visits to the Cinematheque, he befriended other future filmmakers such as François Truffaut, Eric Rohmer and Jacques Rivette. With them, and along with other names such as Claude Chabrol or Alain Resnais, Godard was part of the new wave.

Godard was married twice. With the actress Anna Karina, the protagonist of many of his films of the sixties, he formed one of the most striking couples of that time. At the end of the sixties he joined the interpreter Anne Wiazemsky with whom he also worked and from the seventies his partner has been Anne-Marie Miéville, with whom he has lived in Rolle for the last decades. In 2017 the director Michel Hazanavicius presented the film at the Cannes Festival the Formidablebased on Godard’s memoirs, One year later. The veteran filmmaker was not at all satisfied with the result.

Last survivor of the cinematographic movement that shook the way of telling stories on the screen and inaugurated cinematographic modernity, the Reina Sofía Museum and the French Cinematheque dedicated a tribute to him in 2020 on the occasion of his 90th birthday. In 2018 he presented his latest film, the picture bookat the Rotterdam Festival. Hollywood wanted to recognize Godard with an honorary Oscar in 2010, but the director declined the invitation. That same year he decided to absent himself from the Cannes presentation of what would be his penultimate film, socialist Movie, and send a cryptic note: “Due to my Greek-type problems, I will not be able to attend Cannes. With the festival, I go to death, but not one step further. With affection, Jean-Luc Godard”. He posted the film, a personal collage of images without a clear plot, on the Internet the same day it was presented at Cannes. In one of the last interviews granted then, he referred to his friend-enemy Truffaut: “He never forgave me that I thought his films were lousy. Or at least he didn’t forgive himself for not thinking of my movies that were just as lousy as well.”

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